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Oct 20 2014
rhamphotheca:


Water Bears in Space…
(via: AnimalsHaveProblemsToo)

rhamphotheca:

Water Bears in Space…

(via: AnimalsHaveProblemsToo)

183 notes

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bogleech:

So microscopic Tardigrades or “water bears” have seasonal faces.

Seasonal.

Faces.

I knew I was waiting for something special to learn before writing a tardigrade article for bogleech. I’m gonna get right on that.

bogleech:

So microscopic Tardigrades or “water bears” have seasonal faces.

Seasonal.

Faces.

I knew I was waiting for something special to learn before writing a tardigrade article for bogleech. I’m gonna get right on that.

219 notes

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labellum:

Tardigrade : Water Bears
Tardigrades are able to survive the most extreme environments that would kill almost any other animal. They can take temperatures close to absolute zero and hotter than boiling water, withstand over 1000 times more radiation than humans, can live over a decade without water, endure six times the water pressure in the deepest ocean trench, and even survived in the vacuum of space, making them the only animals to do so.

labellum:

Tardigrade : Water Bears

Tardigrades are able to survive the most extreme environments that would kill almost any other animal. They can take temperatures close to absolute zero and hotter than boiling water, withstand over 1000 times more radiation than humans, can live over a decade without water, endure six times the water pressure in the deepest ocean trench, and even survived in the vacuum of space, making them the only animals to do so.

(Source: mudfooted.com)

221 notes

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astronomy-to-zoology:

Hypsibius dujarini

…is a species of water bear or moss piglet found worldwide. Like other water bears H.dujarini can be found in both mossy and freshwater habitats where it feeds on algae, moss and other plant materials. It is an extremophile like other tardigrades and can survive extreme temperatures, pressures and radiation. It does this by going into a state where its metabolism is almost completely shut down, causing the animal to become ‘freeze dried’ until the environment is ideal for it to emerge from its state. H.dujarini’s genome is in the process of being sequenced and it is one of the most studied tardigrade species.

Phylogeny

Animalia-Tardigrada-Eutardigrada-Parachaela-Hypsibiidae-Hypsibiinae-Hypsibius-dujarini

Image Source(s)

262 notes

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sixthrock:

TARDIGRADES
TARDIGRADES EVERYWHERE

sixthrock:

TARDIGRADES

TARDIGRADES EVERYWHERE

254 notes

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tumblebuggie:

i just want an episode where the villain turns out to be an adorable tardigrade ok? 

OH MY GOD YES!!!!!!WE NEED THIS

tumblebuggie:

i just want an episode where the villain turns out to be an adorable tardigrade ok? 

OH MY GOD YES!!!!!!
WE NEED THIS

342 notes

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calmingmanatee:

[Image description: A picture of a tardigrade, using an electron microscope. The tardigrade is reared up over something brown, and looks like it is looking around. Something green is behind it, and it is on a blue background. TEXT: “It doesn’t matter if you’re not the best at something. What matters is that you try, and don’t give up.”]

(Image from here)
This is Tardigrade!She is very small, and likes to be in moss. And even though is she very small, and can’t move very fast, she never, ever gives up. She is very tough, and can live through almost anything! It’s because she knows that being the best is not important, it’s that you keep going. Your strength lies in your tenacity, as it does with her.

calmingmanatee:

[Image description: A picture of a tardigrade, using an electron microscope. The tardigrade is reared up over something brown, and looks like it is looking around. Something green is behind it, and it is on a blue background. TEXT: “It doesn’t matter if you’re not the best at something. What matters is that you try, and don’t give up.”]

(Image from here)

This is Tardigrade!She is very small, and likes to be in moss. And even though is she very small, and can’t move very fast, she never, ever gives up. She is very tough, and can live through almost anything! It’s because she knows that being the best is not important, it’s that you keep going. Your strength lies in your tenacity, as it does with her.

348 notes

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beatricebiologist:

Because we demand better mascots!

beatricebiologist:

Because we demand better mascots!

300 notes

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bouletcorp:

Gribouillis de nappe.

Tableset doodles

315 notes

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shwlg:

Tardigrade-Tan

shwlg:

Tardigrade-Tan

365 notes

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rhamphotheca:

Water Bears (phylum Tardigrada) are some bad-ass die-hard polyextremophiles, known to withstand temperatures close to absolute zero, 1,000 times more radiation than any other animal, nearly a decade without water, and even the vacuum of space. (via: To Be Fused)

rhamphotheca:

Water Bears (phylum Tardigrada) are some bad-ass die-hard polyextremophiles, known to withstand temperatures close to absolute zero, 1,000 times more radiation than any other animal, nearly a decade without water, and even the vacuum of space. (via: To Be Fused)

717 notes

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cdawgdraws:

So typette and I seem to share a special place in our hearts for tardigrades and also similar artwork. This is all really coincidental and kinda strange but typette has been really gracious and non-accusatory. So you should totally check her out whilst I try to validate myself and put up my own sketches as some sort of proof that I independently thought of this and so did she.
If any of you would be interested in buying a plushie of this than please go here and vote!

cdawgdraws:

So typette and I seem to share a special place in our hearts for tardigrades and also similar artwork. This is all really coincidental and kinda strange but typette has been really gracious and non-accusatory. So you should totally check her out whilst I try to validate myself and put up my own sketches as some sort of proof that I independently thought of this and so did she.

If any of you would be interested in buying a plushie of this than please go here and vote!

646 notes

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rhamphotheca:

Tardigrades (Water Bears/Moss Piglets): 

These ambling, eight-legged microscopic “bears of the moss” are cute, ubiquitous, all but indestructible and a model organism for education

by William R. Miller

The young woman in my office doorway is inquiring about the summer internship I am offering. What’s a tardigrade? she asks…

Tardigrades, I reply, are microscopic, aquatic animals found just about everywhere on Earth. Terrestrial species live in the interior dampness of moss, lichen, leaf litter and soil; other species are found in fresh or salt water.

They are commonly known as water bears, a name derived from their resemblance to eight-legged pandas. Some call them moss piglets and they have also been compared to pygmy rhinoceroses and armadillos. On seeing them, most people say tardigrades are the cutest invertebrate.

At one time water bears were candidates to be the main model organism for studies of development. That role is now held most prominently by the roundworm Caenorhabditis elegans, the object of study for the many distinguished researchers following in the trail opened by Nobel Prize laureate Sydney Brenner, who began working on C. elegans in 1974. Water bears offer the same virtues that have made C. elegans so valuable for developmental studies: physiological simplicity, a fast breeding cycle and a precise, highly patterned development plan…

(read more: American Scientist)

images: Eye of Science/Photo Researchers and Dr. David J. Patterson/Photo Researchers. Illustration at bottom by Tom Dunne, adapted from a figure by the author.

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Water Bears belong to a lesser known phylum of invertebrate animals, the Tardigrada. The first tardigrades were discovered by Goetz in 1773. Over 400 species have been described since that time.

Tardigrades grow only to a size of about 1mm, but they can easily be seen with a microscope. Tardigrade bodies are short, plump, and contain four pairs of lobopodial limbs (poorly articulated limbs which are typical of soft bodied animals). Each limb terminates in four to eight claws or discs. They lumber about in a slow bear-like gait over sand grains or pieces of plant material.

Tardigrade facts.

(Source: kaleidoscopicmind, via galaxyclusters)

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